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Higher rate of death or serious injury on Manx roads

Public Health figures show serious crashes twice as likely on Island

The percentage of people killed or suffering a serious injury as a result of a crash is twice as high on the Isle of Man compared to England.

Data published by Public Health Isle of Man shows the equivalent of 81.2 people per 100,000 residents die or are seriously hurt in collisions on Manx roads, with just 40.8 suffering the same fate in England.

The figures were revealed in the second edition of the Public Health Outcomes Framework, which looks at a range of areas of health and wellbeing on the Island.

The publication also shows the death rate from drug use in the Island is double that of England, with 8.7 per 100,000 compared to 4.3 across. For men, there were 14.4 deaths per 100,000 in the Isle of Man, while in England the figure was less than half at 6.3.

Life expectancy for a Manx resident is similar to those across, but women have a 6.1-year lower healthy life expectancy than their English counterparts at 57.9 years, while men are expected to have 63.8 years of healthy living, marginally higher than those in England.

Women are also much more likely to need hospital treatment as a result of self harm than men. There are 256.7 female hospital admissions per 100,000 for self-harm related matters, while for men it's 158.6.

Breastfeeding rates are lower on the Island, with just over two thirds of mums choosing to breast feed, while Public Health England's data shows almost three quarters do so there.

Children aged 0-14 have a higher admissions rate to hospital as a result of injuries, with 140.1 per 100,000 needing medical intervention on the Island - around 50% higher than in England.

There are some areas where the Isle of Man performs better than England, with a smaller percentage of Manx residents smoking. There were also fewer hospital admissions per 100,000 as a result of alcohol use.

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